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Tag: Jokes

The punniest* word play skills: Puns

*See what I did there? Punniest...funniest...LOL

In our next instalment of typically British ways to communicate, this week’s blog post is dedicated to puns.

Image result for pun memes

Puns are generally defined as jokes that exploit the possible different meanings of a word OR the fact that there are words that sound the same but have completely different meanings, used for comedic or rhetorical effect. Puns are also known as double entendre [from Fr. ‘double meaning’], witticism, quips and word play.

These are not a British phenomenon either, not really; anyone with good language skills in any language can create puns. The internet has made it easier for all to see and understand them. And even before the Internet, some British TV shows in the 1970s and 1980s derived their humour from word play, shows such as Blackadder and Fawlty Towers.

Related image

(from Blackadder, starring Rowan Atkinson)

History

It’s unclear where the pun come from, but it has been around for a long while. William Shakespeare famously used puns and other word play tactics in his plays! Can you see how you could use these examples for comic effect – ‘sun/son’. ‘lines/loins’ and ‘ace/ass’?

The quick wit to think up a pun used to be revered as a sign of mental agility and language mastery in the Ancient times. Some believe that during the Enlightenment, the art of creating puns fell out of fashion, but since the Internet, it has made a miraculous comeback. You just need to look at memes and realise that many are puns in disguise 😉

Image result for animal puns
Image result for animal puns

Obviously, puns can be categorised: animal, objects, dad jokes, grammar, literature, maths etc. The possibilities are infinite and we’ve taken the liberty of giving you 10.

Which one do you think is the funniest? Send us some of your own or one you saw recently that you thought was funny 🙂

  1. The past, the present, and the future walked into a bar. It was tense.
  2. Jokes about German sausages are the wurst.
  3. I am on a seafood diet. I see food, I have to eat it.
  4. What’s the plural of baby? Twins.
  5. I donut understand puns.
  6. Don’t stop retrievin’, hold on to that feline.
  7. If Apple made a car, would it have Windows?
  8. What do you get if you cross an angry sheep and a moody cow? An animal that is in a baaaaad mooooood.
  9. The streets were oddly desserted that night.
  10. Puns are for children, not groan adults.

The particular form of humour everybody talks about

Hello, dear Speak Up Londoners. We laugh. We joke. We spend time trying to make our loved ones laugh. Why? Because, as we’ve stated in the past, laughing is good for our health and our lives in general. And what is the best way to provoke a laugh? By telling a good joke of course! And what produces more jokes than a good sense of humour? Today, dear Speak Up Londoners we thought to share some interesting facts with you!

 

Let’s start with the basics then! What is a joke? Well, a joke is something that someone says in order to generate a laugh in public and it is characterized by a particularly funny final sentence – called the punchline.

 

There are different kinds of jokes, differentiated by theme or structure. Jokes are a display of humour, and as such, they vary deeply in the forms they can have. One particular kind of humour, popular all over the world is British humour.
You have surely heard of it – plus, living in Britain might have given you the chance to hear it. This particularly colourful kind of humour is based on a set of unwritten rules and practices. For instance, some of these practices include the use of devices such as puns, intellectual jokes and innuendos.

 

If you are not very familiar with these terms we are glad to unveil them for you: puns are plays on words, stemming from terms having multiple meanings or similar sounds. Puns being strictly related with language, their use is specific to the language that generated it. Of course, no need to say, we find them hilarious!

Innuendos, instead, are insinuations regarding a person, aimed to denigrate that person without being rude, through words that taken on their own are innocent.

 

Among the other defining characteristics for British humour – again, one of our favourite source of jokes – is the theme of self-deprecation and the almost absolute absence of taboos.

 

Now that we’ve given you a short explanation regarding the most popular form of humour, it’s up to you to become a master at it… or just enjoy it when someone uses it with you! =D =D =D

 

Maria Chiara Strano

 

blogpost-29-06-17

 

The particular form of humour everybody talks about

 Hello, dear Speak Up Londoners. We laugh. We joke. We spend time trying to make our loved ones laugh. Why? Because, as we’ve stated in the past, laughing is good for our health and our lives in general. And what is the best way to provoke a laugh? By telling a good joke of course! And what produces more jokes than a good sense of humour? Today, dear Speak Up Londoners we thought to share some interesting facts with you!

 

Let’s start with the basics then! What is a joke? Well, a joke is something that someone says in order to generate a laugh in public and it is characterized by a particularly funny final sentence – called the punchline.

 

There are different kinds of jokes, differentiated by theme or structure. Jokes are a display of humour, and as such, they vary deeply in the forms they can have. One particular kind of humour, popular all over the world is British humour.
You have surely heard of it – plus, living in Britain might have given you the chance to hear it. This particularly colourful kind of humour is based on a set of unwritten rules and practices. For instance, some of these practices include the use of devices such as puns, intellectual jokes and innuendos.

 

If you are not very familiar with these terms we are glad to unveil them for you: puns are plays on words, stemming from terms having multiple meanings or similar sounds. Puns being strictly related with language, their use is specific to the language that generated it. Of course, no need to say, we find them hilarious!

Innuendos, instead, are insinuations regarding a person, aimed to denigrate that person without being rude, through words that taken on their own are innocent.

 

Among the other defining characteristics for British humour – again, one of our favourite source of jokes – is the theme of self-deprecation and the almost absolute absence of taboos.

 

Now that we’ve given you a short explanation regarding the most popular form of humour, it’s up to you to become a master at it… or just enjoy it when someone uses it with you! =D =D =D